joanatherese

los angeles
12/30/09
special tags

vitaislies:

thewastedgeneration:

a cool photoset

I’m liking this set


lordmoldywart:

I’LL REBLOG THIS TILL I DIE

lordmoldywart:

I’LL REBLOG THIS TILL I DIE


moldypeachfuzz:

Juno x That ‘70’s Show x American Beauty


Let’s Talk About Movies:

Mise-en-scène - Composition
One of the problem facing film director is  that he must arrange shapes, colors, lines and textures. In movies, the dramatic context is usually the determining factor in composition. 
1. Psycho (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock): Because the eye tend to “read” a picture from left to right, film directors often compensate for the intrinsic heaviness of the right side of the composition by weighting the left side somewhat more heavily.
2. Macbeth (Dir. Roman Polanski): In this scene, our eye initially attracted to the face of Lady Macbeth, which is lit in high contrast and is surrounded by darkness. We then scan the brightly lit ‘empty’ space between her and her husband. The third area of interest is Macbeth’s thoughtful face, which is lit in a more subdued manner. The visual interest in this scene corresponds to the dramatic context of the movie, for Lady Macbeth is slowly descending into madness and feels spiritually alienated and isolated from her husband.
3. Stagecoach (Dir. John Ford): Because the top half of the frame tends to be intrinsically heavier than the bottom, most directors include the horizon line well above the vulnerability of his character. Ford contrasts the epic grandeur of Monument Valley, Utah with the rickety fragility of the coach as it makes its dangerous way across the enormous expanse of desert terrain.
4. Jules et Jim (Dir. Francois Truffaut): Compositions group into units of 3,5, and 7 tend to suggest dynamic, unstable relationships. The imbalance of this triangular composition is organically related to the theme of the film, which deals with the shifting love relationships between the three characters. Compositions organized in units of 2,4, or 6, on the other hand, tend to imply stable, harmonious relationships.
5,6. Last Tango in Paris (Dir. Bernardo Bertolucci): Visual motifs are not always intrinsically meaningful, but like symbols, derive their significance from the dramatic context of a film. In this movie, Bertolucci uses the circular light globes as a motif associated with sexual fantasies. The motifs first appear in the lobby of the apartment house where the two lovers meet for their sexual liaisons. The globe motif proliferates lyrically on the screen in the famous climactic tango sequence, shown here.

"You wanted smooth sailing and I’ve always been a tsunami."

10 Word Story by c.r. (via seethestarsablaze)


elisaddiq:

the acceptance of her flaws is what made her flawless


g-iggle:

jzammito:

me in Spanish class

spanish class

g-iggle:

jzammito:

me in Spanish class

spanish class


infiinite3scape:

I think we all have that one person that we never truley get over, that we still think about right before bed everynight, or you will always jump at a chance to talk to ever tho you know you shouldn’t talk to, or the first person you think of whenever you’re drunk.



"Other people are not medicine."

Amy Poehler (via ugh)

zodiacbaby:

*talking to myself as I wobble up the stairs* , you are sober and in control of the situation